The Whole Team

The whole team includes professional advisors and experts.

The whole team

When you run a commercial construction subcontracting business, it is vital to have people who know what you don’t know on your team.

It goes beyond the people on your payroll, to include your consultants, advisors, and other experts. These professionals step in to allow you to create a Whole Team. Some examples may include:

  • Accounting
  • Estimating and Takeoff
  • Compliance and Legal
  • Business Coach
  • Human Resources (HR)
  • Information Technology (IT)
  • Virtual Assistant (VA)
  • Tax Preparation
  • Systems Development
  • Marketing and Social Media

The bottom line is a reliable and candid advisor who understands construction is a valuable business asset.

There is no reason to know the answer to everything. What you need to know is where to get the correct answers.

“Now, will you kindly tell me, WHY I should clutter up my mind with general knowledge, for the purpose of being able to answer questions, when I have men around me who can supply any knowledge I require?” – Henry Ford

The team isn’t whole

Sometimes you have a lack of knowledge, and other times you have a lack of hours. Finding folks who can fill the gaps gives you peace of mind as well as a piece of time.

Frequently, the way you know you need help beyond those you have in your employ is when you run into a knowledge wall, a skills wall, or a time wall.

It isn’t a matter of not being smart enough. You’re plenty smart!

You’re intelligent, or you wouldn’t be in the position of owning a construction business that has grown large enough to necessitate additional professionals. For example, you know how to put geometry and calculus to work in the field, but you may be uncertain of how correctly interpreting financial reports makes sense in the back-office matters of sustainability and profitability.

Finding team members

But, where do you go to find the people who offer the whole team services and advice you need?

Joining and being active in your industry association gives you ample opportunity to mingle with people who can lead you to the specialized professionals you need.

Look through the ads in The Blue Book or other comparable services.

Peruse industry-specific magazines and websites for articles as well as advertisements concerning your needs.

Perhaps most importantly, seek recommendations from others. They may include:

  • Your other advisors and their networks
  • Fellow subcontractors
  • General contractors

Developing the whole team

Jumping into the area of whole team building takes time and isn’t always pretty. Finding just the right people with just the right expertise for your construction business doesn’t happen overnight. Yet, when done correctly, it is worth the time and effort.

Three important factors:

  • Find people who know what you don’t know.
  • Look for folks who stay abreast of their industry expertise.
  • Seek specialists who want you as a person and as a business owner to succeed.

 

We desire to familiarize you with business concepts, which will make it easier for you to be a better commercial construction subcontractor through our blog posts. Some are new ways of looking at things, and others are refreshers. 

The Profit Constructors Provide Contract Document Management and Advisory Board Level counsel for small to medium commercial construction subcontractors.

So you can Run With the Big Dogs! Call us 866-629-7735

Ask the Right Questions

Ask questions to grow your team, your leadership skills, and your construction business.

Want to know what your employees want, so they feel satisfied with their job? Ask them! It isn’t as daunting as you may think.

There are reasons you should be asking the right questions of your team members, both your employees and subs.

  1. It makes them know you care.
  2. You’re better able to lead.
  3. It improves your construction business.

It makes them know your care

The questions you ask go beyond “How’s it going?” to showing you do have an interest in their well-being.

The following list can give you ideas about what types of questions you should be asking.

  • What do you like most about your job?
  • Which task do you find most difficult, tedious, bothersome?
  • Where do you want to be in one year, five years?
  • Are you stuck somewhere? What challenges are you facing?
  • What is [your construction company name] doing, or could be doing, to make you more successful?
  • On a scale of 1 to 10 how happy are you working here?
  • Either at work or outside work, what’s the best thing that happened to you this week?
  • If you owned [your company name,] what’s one thing you would do differently?
  • Who else on the team made a great contribution to the efforts this week? Did he or she overcome an obstacle? Fix a bad situation? Solve a lingering problem?
  • Are you clear about your role? Do you know what you should be doing?
  • Do you feel connected to the rest of the team?
  • What kind of training would you like to receive to help you accomplish your career goals?
  • What’s your most recent accomplishment at work?
  • Do you feel respected by your direct supervisor?
  • Is it fun working here?

You’re better able to lead

Assuming you know what is going on in the lives of your team is a dangerous path to take. Asking the right questions gives you the insight you need to step up your own game.

  • Who can give the older hands help with digital devices?
  • Who’s best at helping new team members learn the ropes?
  • Which process can be fixed or improved?
  • What do you like most about working here?
  • Tell me the number one reason you took a job here?
  • What did you like best about your previous employer?
  • How effective are our team-building activities?
  • Do you feel like coworkers respect each other here?
  • What would make me a better leader?
  • What motivates you to go above and beyond at work?
  • Do you believe [your company name] gives authentic recognition to the people here?
  • What drives you crazy here?

Many of these questions can be off-the-cuff as you talk with your crew and staff throughout the day. Others, you might reserve for one on one meetings.

This blog post about leadership, found on the website of Lighthouse gives a great deal of information concerning having one on one meetings with your staff.

Perhaps the most valuable piece of advice from the post is this:

“Action is what leads to change and improvement. It’s what starts the flywheel going to make these the mega-valuable meeting they are.

This is why the 2 questions to ask in every one on one meeting are:

1) What can you do to take action or make progress on what we talked about today?

2) What can I do to take action or make progress on what we talked about today?

By asking these questions, you’re working *together* to make things better. It creates a psychological contract between the two of you to both keep your promises.”

It improves your construction business

Eleanor Estes, CEO of TPI, Inc., one of the top IT and engineering recruiting firms in the country says, “As a leader in your organization, you set the culture – you establish the norms, and your example should trickle down throughout the company. Your company is a place that is made up of many different people. And if you are doing it right, the people you hire will enhance your company so that the whole will be greater than the sum of its parts.”

That leads to asking further questions which can help you find ways to build your team as well as improve your commercial construction business.

  • Do you think [your company name] supports you in your professional development?
  • Can you use one word to describe our company culture?
  • What are some ways that we can improve communication at [your company name]?
  • What’s one thing you’d like to see us continue doing here?
  • How well does your supervisor support your developmental goals?
  • Do you feel comfortable providing feedback to your supervisor?
  • Would you refer someone to work here?
  • Do you believe the management team is all on the same page?
  • What do you think is our company’s biggest strength that we should be focusing on?

Ask the right questions. And, listen to the answers. Use the information to help your team members grow, improve your leadership ability, and enhance your commercial construction business.

 

We desire to familiarize you with business concepts which will make it easier for you to be a better commercial construction business owner through our blog posts. Some will be new ways of looking at things, and others will be refreshers.

Schulte and Schulte Provides Accounting, Contract Document Management, and Advisory Board Level counsel for small to medium commercial construction subcontractors.

So you can Run With the Big Dogs! Call us 866-629-7735

 

Achievement-Based Bonus Programs That Don’t Stink – Part 3

Achievement based programs help you make things happen.

Achievement based programs help you make things happen.

Build the bonus program

Building an achievement-based bonus program will take some effort on your part, yet it need not be overly complicated. As a matter of fact, simplicity can be key to success. While there is room to base an incentive program on a quarterly or annual basis, it is likely shorter-term situations will be easier to design, build, and carry out.

Even if you do intend to incorporate long-term bonus programs it is a good idea to start small. Here are 3 reasons why:

  1. It is easier to design and carry out
  2. Your employees want their rewards sooner rather than later
  3. Successful bonus programs build interest amongst your employees making them eager for the next challenge

The size of your construction company, the typical length of your projects, and the number of employees you have will all factor into the length and frequency of each bonus program.

Just like building your construction business takes time, building your achievement-based bonus program will take time to establish and function properly. Eventually, your company may become known as the great place to work because of (such-and-such) annual bonus program. In the meantime, start developing bonus bits which will fit into the overall concept which is part of your company culture.

The 6 Ds  

Remember this from the last post?

At the highest level of implementation are two considerations:

  1. Motivating your employees to excel beyond their base job descriptions and regular duties.
  2. Exceeding your client’s expectations in both small and big ways.

Thinking of the above two considerations, use the 6 Ds to design your program.

  • Determine the objectives

 

  • Decide who will be eligible to participate (consider team or individual based)

 

  • Develop the achievement criteria

 

  • Devise the reward levels

 

  • Derive the funding formula (Where’s the money coming from to pay for this?)

 

  • Decree the method of payment

 

We’re going to break it down step by step.

Determine the objectives

What do you want your team to accomplish? Raise productivity or efficiency? Drive teamwork? Improve customer service? Increase safety habits?

Consider: It is easy to see that a team which works together will without fail be more productive than one that doesn’t. If your team is filled with a majority of workers speaking a foreign language, steps to improve their English skills will inevitably improve customer service. Improving safety awareness and habits is bottom line good for all involved.

Decide who will be eligible to participate

Will this be a company wide initiative, or will only persons performing particular job types be in the running? Will all your field crews be involved or one specific team? Will the office staff be the only ones eligible?

Consider: Devising a scheme which is available to every employee can be tough. Yet, in order for all in your employees to get in on the fun you may decide to have one plan running for field hands and a different one for office staff, or some derivative thereof.

Develop the achievement criteria

What must be accomplished in order to receive the bonus? What are the parameters involved? Will there be levels of reward based on levels of accomplishment?

Consider: Developing the criteria concerning reaching the goals may be the easy part, yet if parameters are left to chance there is room for great error. For instance, if speed is the only criteria, both craftsmanship and safety may be neglected.

Devise the reward levels

Setting attainable benchmarks along the way to the final goal eases the tension which might arise from seeing a big hairy objective. Even if the final goal isn’t met, at least some amount of achievement will have taken place and be worthy of reward.

Consider: Use hard deadlines, percentages, frequencies, or volume as units of measurement when determining the levels which can be achieved.

Derive the funding formula

Just how are you going to pay for all this stuff? Sure, the entire, overall, sweeping objective of having achievement goals in the first place is to improve your operation thereby improving the profitability of your construction company. But you have to start somewhere, right?

Consider: 1) Dig into your own pocket if you must. 2) Give low or no cost rewards with integrity, letting your crew know their part in the effort will pay off as you grow. 3) Contact Schulte and Schulte. We’ll show you how to begin now preparing for fantastic future achievement bonuses your crew will rave about.

Decree the method of payment

Tell your crew exactly what they can expect for each benchmark they reach. Then when they reach it – give it to them.

Consider: Have a party – onsite or elsewhere. Make a razzle-dazzle of the presentations, keep it humorous and fun while at the same time making sure your people know you really do care about them and you appreciate their effort.

A simple example

Before I get into the example I’ll give you a bit of background concerning where this story came from. I’ve recently become a bit of a construction-centric podcast junkie. (A topic which I’ll likely share with you in the future.) The following story came from one of the podcasts I heard early in my podcast adventure.

On the podcast I was listening to, a fellow who is a construction business owner was being interviewed. This guy believes wholeheartedly in incentive bonuses and he shared the story of the first time he tried it. He said that he looked at the jobsite, looked at the scheduled completion date, looked at his crew and came up with his plan.

He told his crew that if they could complete the job three weeks ahead of schedule he would take them all to a local steak house where they would all be treated to a first-class meal. If they could complete the job two weeks ahead of schedule he would have a big pizza party for the entire crew. If they completed the job one week ahead of schedule he would take them all to the fast-food joint and buy them each a hamburger, fries, and a soft-drink. As it turned out, the pizza party is what took place. He said it cost him a couple hundred bucks and came out of his own pocket.

How it worked

So, here is how his story breaks down in accordance with the 6 Ds.

He determined the objective of finishing early (I don’t know if he had the added parameters of safety and workmanship in his objective, but it would have behooved him to do so.)

He decided the entire crew would be eligible and it would be a team effort.

He developed the achievement criteria based on the measurement of time. One week, two weeks, or three weeks.

He devised the reward levels by establishing just what the crew could expect determined by when they reached the goal of early completion.

He derived the funding formula by looking at his checkbook and deciding it was worth it to him to see if his experiment would work.

He decreed the method of payment by letting his crew know exactly what they could expect based on what they achieved.

Further information

The Project Management Institute produced a rather lengthy study and article concerning Incentive Programs in Construction Projects.

Here are a few of my take-aways from their article.

  1. They strongly recommend the participation of employees in planning and implementing an incentive-based program. They say, “As for the ‘participation’ parameter, previous studies demonstrated that employee involvement contributes to the amount of information employees have about what is occurring, and to the feeling of control over and commitment to what is decided.”
  2. Their determination is that presenting a single objective is preferred over multiple objectives.
  3. Further, they advise a monetary program measuring group performance is somewhat preferred over a non-monetary one measuring individual performance.
  4. They say high quality of management contributes to a high likelihood of program success.
  5. My final takeaway — they say, “Under some conditions, participation may lead to higher-quality decisions.”

This has been the third in a 3-part series. You can catch the first here and the second here.

Now that you see the potential in developing an achievement-based bonus program it is time to get in touch. We can help you analyze and develop the financial end of the process. Click here or call 866-629-7735.

Performance-Based Bonus Programs That Don’t Stink – Part 1

bonus programs and incentives that don't stink

bonus programs and incentives that don't stink

Some bonus programs stink

Bonus programs based on the wrong parameters or instituted poorly can be really yucky for everyone. Your team loses, you lose, and you throw your hands up in despair thinking bonus programs are a waste of time and (more importantly) a waste of money.

Yet, if you get it right, the win-win effect takes place bringing everyone (including your clients) into a much better place. Instituting bonus incentives in your construction contracting or service business is worth the time and effort.

A bad example

One of the best companies I ever worked for made a honking mistake when they first instituted a bonus program which offered a rather stunning reward. I mean, who do you know who wouldn’t want to have an all-expense paid, eight-day vacation with the person of his or her choice in a foreign land while the paycheck continued to roll in?

In case you’re wondering if I’m calling sour grapes simply because I never achieved the bonus, think again. I did achieve the bonus. My hubby and I were delighted to be a part of the group which arrived in Thailand ready for an adventure. Yet, we were only able to go because the company realized after the first disastrous year they had made a parameter mistake when instituting the bonus.

There isn’t reason to go into all the details, but you’ll understand what went wrong when I mention that the goal which was set the first year could only be reached by a limited number of employees. It had to do with location. The folks who could reach the particular goal set for that year all lived in metropolitan areas. Those of us who had no hope for reaching the goal lived in rural areas. And yes, you guessed right. When we first learned what the goals were, we looked at each other, smiled, and mentioned that we weren’t possibly going to reach that goal. So, nothing in our behavior changed.

The point is, when setting goals for your team, be sure they are attainable. That doesn’t mean make it easy, it just means the goal should be one everyone in your employ can see hope of achieving. Which brings me to my next point.

Achievement rather than performance

Ah, words. Words can mess with our minds. This report from the University of Michigan will give you more insight into the validity of choosing words which are more in line with what you want to convey.  So, there is every reason to choose the correct word when determining what it really is that you want to accomplish. The word performance tends to remind us of a stage. When a person is asked to perform there is the concept of getting it right for the sake of the audience (in this case the boss.) But, when a person is asked to achieve the idea inherent in the word is that of making ones-self better. You can see how that simple change in words will set the right tone for introducing bonuses to your team. It will also aid you in determining parameters that are highly advantageous for all involved.

Achievement-based bonus program

Perhaps stating what an achievement-based program is NOT will be helpful. It is not:

  • A freewill gift (for instance a Christmas or Chanukah present)
  • Delivered randomly without a plan
  • A tenure bonus (although this is close)
  • An employee referral program (yet it will add juice to your attempts to gain employable referrals)
  • A signing bonus

Now, let’s talk about what a well-executed achievement-based bonus program IS. While you can make a case for “a job well done is its own reward,” you must admit raising the bar with extra incentives is a useful tool in your management toolbelt. When you reward accomplishment, you help people achieve more (sometimes more than they thought themselves capable) and you:

  • Increase teamwork and camaraderie
  • Decrease unsafe practices
  • Escalate productivity
  • Improve customer service
  • See your business improve

Results are what count

After all, incentives are all about achieving specific results rather than simply doing a good job.

In part two of this 3-part post we’ll talk about how to determine which bonus initiatives will be most advantageous for your construction contracting company. There will be information on how to implement the program. And there’ll be the part about “which incentives to give.”

 Contact us here or call 866-629-7735.

 

Implement a “Give it Away” Policy with Your Construction Team

Develop an above and beyond policy your team uses for dealing with clients

Develop an above and beyond policy your team uses for dealing with clients

Last time, I talked about making decisions concerning whether a change order is necessary when dealing with requests from clients. If you haven’t read that post, take time to do so. Otherwise, what I’m saying from here on out might not make much sense to you. Because, this time I’ll tell you how to go one step further in the process.

Ever thought about telling your team to give time and service to your clients at no additional charge? Ever thought about implementing a Give it Away policy?

Whoa, I know what you’re thinking. “I can’t possibly allow the crew to give it away, I’ll go broke!” That would possibly be true, unless you have a specific strategy in play concerning what and when to give away.

There are 3 levels involved in developing a Give it Away policy

Model the behavior

Model the behavior you want your team to emulate. Be the man or woman of integrity, conscience, and kindness you want every person on your team to be. When at all possible go the extra mile, give your clients more than they expected, be the guy or gal they want to recommend to others.

Teach your team

Teach your team what is acceptable in the give-more-than-expected category. Each trade will have its own set of approved above and beyond measures. Take the time to think about what will be on your “yes we can” list and make sure your team knows what they are. You’ll also have to let them know there may be things which pop up that aren’t on the list. Give them the metrics for discerning which are worthy. Should it be added to the list? You decide. And yes, there are likely to be mistakes made. Learn from it, teach your crew from it, and move on.

Reward the team

Reward those of your team who follow your guidelines and your model. Consider having a once a week Tattle and Reward session during your morning huddle. Fridays are a good day to practice this as events will be fresh in your team’s minds. It will likely take a few weeks to get the idea rolling, and its likely you’ll have to do much of the initial “tattling,” yet your crew will catch on. Encourage people to tattle on themselves also.

Here are some examples of what you want to hear from your team:

“I saw Dave helping our client unload some heavy boxes from his pickup.”

“I noticed Leslie installing a door knocker on Mrs. Smith’s new door.”

“I fixed the catch on the electrical box, so the client could open it from his wheelchair.”

You get the idea. The reward could be as simple as a round of applause for the person who is being tattled on. Or, you may wish to have a number of gift cards ready to be handed out to the hands who excelled. A five-dollar coffee shop card, a ten-dollar fast food card, a fifty-dollar gift card for a department store, or even higher denominations to a tool store might be in order. Some other rewards you may wish to include are branded coffee mugs and water bottles, lunch with the boss, books, lottery or movie tickets, a car wash certificate, or any item you know would be appreciated. It is up to you or a supervisor you designate what you’ll be giving, depending on the level of engagement from your crew members.

More for you to consider

The actions involved as well as the rewards given can range from the humble (screwed a latch back on a window) to the impressive (saved a client’s life.)

Training your team to be thoughtful won’t happen overnight.

The rewards you and your team receive by practicing going above and beyond won’t always be easily measurable.

Be sure to bring your sense of humor to the Tattle and Reward meeting, because . . . well you know, construction hands “just wanna have fun.”

If a mistake has been made, remember rewards take place in public, yet admonishments are taken care of in private.

Consider your social marketing angle and think about asking your team to provide pictures as often as possible. A phone and a specified email address could be all the tools they’ll need.

You can reach our construction accounting specialized team by calling 866-629-7735 or getting in touch here.

 

Short and Sweet the Way to Meet

Morning huddles help your business grow and and be successful.

Morning huddles help your business grow and and be successful.

Better management in your construction business through daily meetings

Safety meetings are Boring! But they don’t have to be, and they shouldn’t be!

Daily huddles, morning meetings, toolbox talks, tailgate meetings, safety meetings – it doesn’t matter what you call it, having a meeting daily with your crew is essential.

If your construction safety officer, your site foreman, or you are the person in charge of the safety meeting make sure the meetings are worth attending. Whoever is leading should be up to the challenge of briefly conveying the message in ways that keep everyone involved and glad they attended.

An explanation (of sorts)

Before going further, I’ll explain what led to this particular article being written. As the Office Mom here at Schulte and Schulte, I was looking for information concerning how to hold morning meetings for our virtual office. (BTW, I found some good stuff.) And, along the way two things happened.

First of all, I discovered there seems to be a wide difference in how many types of businesses outside the construction industry use the morning meeting and how many construction contractors typically use the time. (And, sorry . . . but, if I were giving grades, many contractors would get an “F” for how they conduct their meetings.)

The second thing that happened was, I sat down with a construction superintendent and one of the subjects which came up was “toolbox talks.” He was frustrated with the process he had been given and admitted that he often simply skipped the “talks.” He felt that his company only provided materials and sign-off sheets because they were hoping to avoid the ire of OSHA.

So, my friend, (you know who you are) this is for you.

Getting down to basics

When – NOT whenever you happen to think about it. But, daily. Daily so it becomes an ingrained habit with both you and your workers. And, make the start of the meeting at an odd time – say 7:07. The odd time helps your crew think in increments of minutes and subtly influences the pace of the meeting. Plus, it sets this meeting apart as being something different and special.

Where – NOT at the local restaurant. But, at the jobsite. Being at the jobsite frees precious minutes to get going when the meeting is over. (Some companies provide a mini-breakfast like doughnuts, or bagels, or breakfast burritos, and coffee, but it isn’t necessary, and you need to determine what is best for you and your crew.)

Why – NOT just because you will be able to satisfy some OSHA requirements through ongoing training. (Although that is just one of many advantages.) But, because it is the most effective method to refresh your workers’ knowledge, to deal with up-to-date safety checks, and exchange current information.

How – NOT through haphazard and wishful thinking. But, by making attendance mandatory and . . . well that is the subject of the rest of this article.

Having morning meetings that rock!

The time spent in the morning as a team helps improve individual morale as well as reinforce company culture. This is the place to let everyone know about “having each other’s back” and giving your workers the means to be successful on a daily basis.

This is not the time to investigate bottlenecks. Rather, this time is an opportunity to quickly convey the necessary information and guide employees in a given direction.

One

Start on a high note by letting different members of the team (quickly) describe any “wins” they’ve had on the job or in their personal lives. “We stood up twelve columns yesterday, two more than our goal.” “My wife gave birth to twins over the weekend!” You see how this leads right into team unity as well as team morale.

Two

Impart the important information – often safety tips. Don’t worry about finding safety topics to discuss. You can find them here, here, here, here, and here. And there is at least one toolbox talks app you may want to check out here. Depending on time of year, type of job, or other situations you can choose those most suited to your present needs. You may also wish to leave out the safety tips on occasion and use those precious minutes to discuss successful job milestones, or overall company health and wellbeing, or another exciting topic which is pertinent to the team.

Three

Make assignments concerning what each individual or team needs to accomplish for the day. (Make sure you document this in writing or on the appropriate app so there won’t be any “But I thought we decided . . .” later in the day or week.)

Four

End on a high note. It could be a quick cheer, or something like a daily inspirational quote, or asking people to name something they learned yesterday, or even a daily joke or pun. Your team feeling uplifted and cheerful at the end of the meeting will help set the tone for the rest of their day.

5 important tips

  1. Keep everyone standing – this helps convey the brevity of the meeting

 

  1. Turn off all phones and (do your best to) limit other distractions

 

  1. Start and end on time

 

  1. Stay on topic

 

  1. Document what was decided (Who was assigned to do what and in what time frame?)

5 good ideas you may wish to try

  1. Have the crew participate in brief stretching exercises to prepare for the work ahead

 

  1. Provide snack-like breakfast items (perhaps only once a week or on special occasions)

 

  1. Include “best of” types of mentions or rewards occasionally during the meeting (Who went above and beyond to satisfy a customer? Who had a great eye for the possible safety hazard yesterday and took care of the situation? Who is a new daddy?)

 

  1. Consider having different members of the team present the “main” topic as guided by their expertise or some other criteria.

 

  1. Invite office personnel to present occasionally when items like filling out the necessary paperwork, using the proper channel for reporting hours worked, teaching use of new apps, or other office-centric activities need to be addressed.

Some final thoughts

Ten to fifteen minutes seems to be the most recommended time frame for completing the morning meeting, but there are those who say seven minutes is just perfect.

Prepare your agenda in advance of each meeting, stick to a format that works for you and your team.

Create a predictable rhythm the team will anticipate, thus helping them to be cued and ready to participate at each changing stage of the morning huddle.

 Get in touch to see how Schulte and Schulte can be of service

to your construction contracting or service business by going here

10 Personal Tools Every Construction Contractor Needs

I’ve discovered Construction Contractors and Subcontractors are among the most adept and proficient folks around. They wear such a profusion of hats (skilled tradesman, project manager, marketer, salesman, HR manager, supply-chain manager, customer-service representative, PR manager) it can be mind boggling.

Yet there are 10 Personal Tools they need to use no matter which hat they happen to be wearing at any given time.

The quality traits (tools) of excellent construction contractors

  1. Planning Ability

Simply determining to begin a business built on your skill set as well as your desire to learn more about what it takes to “be in business” is a great start. At every turn, your ability to plan and prepare for what is coming down the road will make a difference in how you manage, build, and maintain your business.

  1. Strong Work Ethic

You have to have a ton of ambition. It goes beyond just getting up every day and going to work. You actually enjoy fixing the problems that arise. And you’re actively looking for more jobs which mean you have more problems to solve.

  1. Strong People Skills

You not only have to manage the guys and gals in the field and office, you also have to work with the customer – who can range from general contractors to home owners and anywhere in between. You’re also good at letting other people’s strengths shine through.

  1. Confident

You have to remain confident in your overall ability to complete the many tasks at hand. That doesn’t mean you think you can never make a mistake. It does mean you’re sure you’ll be able to learn from those mistakes and continue moving forward.

  1. Open Minded

Going hand-in-hand with your ability to remain confident is your ability to remain open minded when new ideas, new concepts, and new means to accomplish a task are presented to you. You’re willing to weigh the evidence before making a final decision.

  1. Money Management Skill

When capital is limited and needs to be utilized wisely, you know how to manage for right now while still planning for the future. You know how to keep a handle on cash flow and how to use financial reports for building your business.

  1. Networking Ability

You’re a relationship builder. You pay attention to what others tell you. You’re willing to help others even when it doesn’t seem there will be a quid pro quo. You make others feel at ease when they’re around you.

  1. Delegator

Even though you likely began your construction contracting business wearing a multitude of hats you know when to give one or more of those hats to others. You know how to give people a task to complete without micro-managing how they complete it.

  1. Risk Taker

You understand that taking a risk is the only way to move forward. You look at all the ways you can think of to mitigate the risk, you take those actions, and you still know that failure is possibility.

  1. Integrity

Honesty and trust are central to your integrity. You demonstrate your integrity by being trustworthy and dependable. You are principled and can be counted on to behave in honorable ways even when no one is watching.

Stocking your tool box

Having as many of these tools as possible in your personal tool box will make your job as a construction contractor flow better. You may not have every single tool in this list shined and ready to use. But, if your desire is to scale your construction contracting business then you’ll discover these are personal traits or qualities that will work well for you now and in the future. If you find you have personal weak points, be sure to surround yourself with folks who are strong in those areas. Some things you should consider are: hire a business coach, seek a mentor, outsource some areas, look for qualified advisors, build a good team.

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Why yes, Schulte and Schulte, LLC is a great option for your bookkeeping and accounting outsourced needs. And by golly, we’re team players. Give us a call 480-442-4032 or toll free 866-629-7735