3 Steps to Building Your Core Team

Building a core team to improve your construction business

Building your core team with purpose

No matter how small or large your commercial construction business is, having a core group of people (a team) who “get it” will make your job easier. You want people who see your vision, agree with your vision, and will work to help you accomplish your vision.

Before you begin the process of building a core team, you must have a vision for your contracting business. Because, quite simply, your core team must have hooks on which they can hang their hats (and their understanding.)

Building your core team even when there are skeptics

Some folks are born skeptical, live skeptical, and will probably die the same way. And there isn’t much any of us can do about them. So, for the purpose of this article we’re not going to worry much about them.

Yet, there are those who may be skeptical of a process, an intended outcome, or even your vision before they’re brought into the fold. Telling chronic skeptics apart from occasional skeptics is fairly easy when you take the time to look.

This might help. Some names society has adopted to describe skeptics are:

  • Party pooper
  • Wet blanket
  • Killjoy
  • Spoilsport
  • Grinch
  • Naysayer
  • Grouch

And, the way you tell the difference is your level of surprise. Yep, if you’re totally taken off guard by Harry’s party poopiness, it is likely he is simply having a bad day. Likewise, if you’re surprised that Sheila agreed to the request without complaint it is likely she is most frequently a naysayer.

If you’re interested in more information about dealing with naysayers, check out this article from Entrepreneur.

Step 1 Building your core team through equipping them

You pass on your vision from the very beginning of the hiring process. Your vision must be included in the handbook each new hire receives. From that point onward, the vision must be spoken of, acted on, and entrenched in the daily processes you adopt. If your employees don’t know what you want or expect of them, they flounder. If your vision is made perfectly clear they have an easier time of knowing which path to follow next.

Step 2 Building your core team through training them

That means investing in them by sharing podcasts, books, and articles that you read. It means taking them or sending them to classes, workshops, and conferences. Give them responsibilities that stretch and motivate them. Most importantly, show them what you value through your own daily actions.

Step 3 Building your core team by mobilizing them

It does no good to network your team into the vision if you’re unprepared to mobilize them. Perhaps Albert Einstein said it best: “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

Put another way by Warren Buffet: “Hire smart people and get out of their way.”

Determine what skill sets, talents, and know-how each of your core team members has. Equip them and train them, then give them the freedom to make your construction contracting business better.

What core team building looks like

A core team is a gathering of like-minded people who are all about the vision. It takes clarity on what that team should look like. Further, it takes an investment to help them reach expectations.

 

It is our desire this article (among our growing library of construction-centric informational articles) is helpful in assisting commercial construction contractors build better building businesses. 

Providing Accounting, Contract Document Management, and Advisory Board Level counsel for small to medium commercial construction subcontractors.

So you can Run With the Big Dogs. Call us! 866-629-7735

 

Building Castles and High Rises

Building company culture into your team.

Building streams

This report is going to follow two diverse streams which converge to make one river of thought. The first stream has to do with an encounter on a modern city sidewalk and the second with a look at the building of a medieval castle.

Building high rise office structures 

On Tonya’s and my recent trip to Salt Lake City, we had occasion to walk from the convention center to a nearby grocery store. Therefore, we passed through a covered sidewalk which was designed to allow foot traffic to pass safely by a project under construction. As we walked, we noticed three construction workers scurrying past us in the opposite direction. I, being that kind of tourist, asked, “What are you building?”

The quick response from the fellow in the lead was, “America, one building at a time!”

Kapow!

Both Tonya and I were elated with his answer.

In addition,  may I suggest if the people on your crew answer the same way, you’re likely doing something right.

Building an ancient castle in the twenty-first century

Castles aren’t easy to come by these days. Come to think of it, they never were.

For instance, there is this interesting project going on now in France. The folks involved are building a medieval castle with the tools and techniques of the 13th century. The building is expected to be completed in 2023.

An interesting finish date, considering the project first broke ground in 1997. Not bad for a project which, from its inception, was expected to take a quarter of a century to complete.

This castle isn’t to live in. This castle is a classroom in progress.

Guédelon is the world’s biggest experimental archaeological site – and some would say the most ambitious too.”

In other words, stonemasons, blacksmiths, carpenters, woodcutters, tilers, rope-makers, dyers, the builders of the castle seem to look at their part of the project in two ways. For the first way they discuss what they’ve learned. Then, in the second, how proud they are to have been able to contribute.

The streams converge

Above all, what strikes me concerning these two stories is the pride these builders take in their work. Whether the answer is, “I’m building a castle,” or “America, one building at a time,” the question is always out there – what do you do? Where do you work?

Building the answer into your company culture, helping employees see how their contribution matters isn’t always easy. Yet it is worth it.

And, the key is to inspire.

As a result, this is where the river begins to flow.

It is a crazy idea which the folks naming military operations have used successfully for a few years now. Don’t get me wrong, it was they who got it wrong many times along the way until they began to understand how useful the nicknames they used for their operations could be. This article, Naming Military Operations is a War of Words, from the USO website is lengthy, yet quite informative concerning the power of a name.

Building great names to encourage your team

The simply corollary for you as a commercial construction business owner is to use the art of naming projects in such a way as to shape perceptions, boost morale, and reinforce policy objectives. It is a subtle yet effective way to encourage your employees to “own” the importance of each project.

Here are some examples, so you can see what I mean.

You could call your job building the new emergency hospital by the hospital’s name (and bore your staff) or you could use the name “Mission Life Saver.”

If your crew is providing work on the new Mercedes Benz dealership, consider naming the job “Project Hot Wheels.” Or, you might try “Mission Luxurious Rides.”

Did you get the grocery store contract? Think about calling it “Project Nourishment.”

3 ways to find memorable names

  1. If you’re into word play and developing great project names – do it yourself.
  2. Perhaps there is someone in your office or on your crews who would enjoy providing the names – give them the privilege. Do you have word-wise teens at home? Give them the task.
  3. Ask your team members for suggestions – then choose the best one. Or combine a few of the suggestions to come up with the top name.

Another way to use the nicknaming strategy

You can use the same strategy of nicknaming for your in-house projects.

Shop organizing day becomes Operation Thunder.

Documenting office systems can be given the nickname, Project LifeBlood.

And, choosing a new office or shop location might become Mission Possibilities.

You get the idea. The nicknames add an importance level to your various jobs as well as in-house projects.

Building Castles and High Rises and Everything Else

The work you take on in your construction contracting business is important! Be sure your team knows that.

 

It is our desire this article (among our growing library of construction-centric informational articles) is helpful in assisting commercial construction contractors build better building businesses.  

Providing Accounting, Contract Document Management, and Advisory Board Level counsel for small to medium commercial construction subcontractors.

So you can Run With the Big Dogs. 866-629-7735

Change Orders

how to deal with construction change orders

how to deal with construction change orders

In a perfect world war, divorce, and change orders wouldn’t exist. Sorry, we live in an imperfect world. As for war and divorce – I got nutten. Yet, I can provide some information concerning how to deal with the inevitable change orders that are going to arise during many construction projects.

Change order basics

Construction change orders are used for altering a construction contract. They are contract documents both parties agree to, signifying they understand there is a change to the original agreement. Further, a change order defines the costs and time factors which will affect and alter the original construction contract. That being said, it is well to develop a proactive change order management strategy.

The first way to diminish the use of change orders is to create the best initial contract. And, because unforeseen conditions, designer error or omission, or a change of heart can all be starting points for change orders it will serve you well to have a formal change order request process addressed in your original contract.

Building your change order process

These 5 steps are a good foundation for building your change order process.

  1. Develop the timeframe requirements concerning initiating a change order request

 

  1. Determine what specific information and documentation will be required

 

  1. Note who the authorized agents will be concerning the approval of the change order

 

  1. Lay out how communication between all parties involved will be handled

 

  1. Negotiate terms concerning scope, costs, and timeframe

It is also a good idea to let your clients know that submitting a change order request does not immediately cause work to change. There can very well be time involved in your research concerning the costs of labor and materials as well as other factors.

Other change order considerations

If one phase of the construction must be torn out in order to accommodate the requested changes the costs and time constraints are likely to be considerable. That is probably the easy part for your client to understand.

What they may not know is the other costs you’ll be considering concerning what must be changed. I asked our team here at Schulte and Schulte to give me some ideas concerning what monetary factors you, the construction contractor need to consider when negotiating a change to your original contract.

Depending on which trade you’re a part of, all or only some of these items may be factors.

  • Labor
  • Materials
  • Equipment usage
  • Restocking fees
  • Shipping costs
  • Taxes

Be sure to include each item in your calculations concerning the costs associated with the change.

Change order forms

You can get a general idea about a change order form here.  Of course, this site offers this disclaimer should you choose to use their form. “The forms on this site are provided ‘As-Is.’ By using these forms you agree that you are using them at your own risk. Most of the free forms are not prepared by an attorney and may need substantial modification.”

You can see another example of what your change order form could contain here.

Better yet, (and, this is what we recommend) if you’re using Knowify, there is a simple way to deal with the change order form. Check out the video here.

We’re able to provide information concerning the use of Knowify in your construction accounting process as well as your change order process. Get in touch here or give us a call 480-442-4032 or 866-629-7735.

5 Strategies to Retain Your Best Employees – Part 4

Retain construction employees through the use of traditions, rituals, and fun.

Retain construction employees through the use of traditions, rituals, and fun.

This is the fourth in a 5-part series about specific strategies you can use in order to retain your best construction employees. You can find the first installment here, the second here, and the third here.

Have fun!

Of all the things that make you a Construction Industry insider, one of the most overlooked is knowing how much fun it can be. Just one of the many reasons to be in the construction trades is the camaraderie which tends to be a part of the scene. The guys and gals who are “in the ranks” often participate in good humored horseplay, fun “competitions,” and silly banter. Turns out, according to this study, having fun is good for them and good for your business.

And, you can set apart your construction company as an exceptional place to work by strategically implementing fun activities for your employees. Part of that process becomes building traditions and rituals into what your crews will experience in their day to day activities. Repetition is the key.

Think about the fellows who stand on a stage with the express purpose of getting folks to laugh. Comedians are taught and understand that repetition of certain key words or specific ideas will often send their audience into fits of laughter before the words are even out of their mouths. (If you doubt me, check with Tonya, one of our founders, who used to be one of the actors in this comedy crew at Marriage can be Murder, in Las Vegas, Nevada.)

Traditions and rituals

From your own experience both as a family member and as a part of a professional team, you know traditions help create a sense of shared history and close-knit teams. Not only that, traditions and rituals can give employees something to look forward to on a day-by-day basis.

While it is possible for you to create certain traditions, they’re often best when they come about organically or spontaneously. For example, when “George” describes himself as “a high walker and a smooth talker” add those words to his name each time you speak with him, or give him a reward, or mention him in meetings. Help the happy accident circumstances which give the crew a laugh on the job become part of the rituals your crew can tell the newbies about.

Creating workplace rituals and traditions is a good way to give your employees something to look forward to. Want some ideas? This article from Michael Kerr presents a variety of options to consider.

The icing on the cake

Lastly, the icing on the cake of employee retention is that happy crews attract happy clients.

There is a Cold Stone Creamery store in the Phoenix valley which has a young crew of people who our family watched chant and sing their way to a generous offering of tips one busy ice cream evening. I’m not suggesting your construction crews learn a few songs together (but, if you find they have the talent . . .) What I am saying is that when your people can demonstrate to your clients that your company is a happy place to work, they also demonstrate it is a good place from which to purchase goods and services.

Here is another example of how Southwest Airlines (a company known for having fun) encourages their employees to bring some humor into the lives of their customers.

Like I said, of all the things that make you a Construction Industry insider, one of the most overlooked is knowing how much fun it can be. Making sure your crews are experiencing the pride that comes with building is great. Making sure they are having fun while they do it is even better.

Your turn

Think of some simple ways you can encourage your team to have fun while still doing a great job for your clients.

Build Collaborations – Find and establish key relationships and networks

This is part one in a five-part series concerning Steps to Scaling Your Construction Contracting Business. You can see the introduction to the series by clicking here.

No matter where your particular sandbox is located there are times when you need to cooperate with others in order to get your sand castle built. Finding ways to establish connections that make sense boils down to the old report card standard, “Plays well with others.”

I can’t recall how many times my dad (who went from driving a lumber supply truck, to slinging both a hammer and a saw, to supervising major commercial construction projects) told me, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” Dad worked that bit of wisdom – all the time.

Growing your construction contracting business is more than simply getting more and more customers; it is about growing alliances, meeting new people, forming partnerships, building networks. It’s about establishing and nurturing relationships.

Relationships come in all sizes

Some of the groups of people and organizations you’ll want to consider when deciding to establish relationships and networks are:

  • Service providers
  • Subcontractors
  • Former employers or coworkers
  • Professional associations
  • Service organizations
  • Suppliers
  • Customers
  • Present and past employees
  • Neighbors (both personal and professional)

Focus on helping others and facilitating connections

Whether you participate in coopertition (cooperation with your competition) or you offer pro bono services through a service organization, whether you form an alliance with a subcontractor whose business offerings compliment your own or you help align your supplier with a new customer, all along the way you’re putting in the building blocks which help establish you as a major player in the industry.

If your only thought is about how you can meet the next guy to sell to, you’ll miss out on a lot of relationship building opportunities. It takes time, it doesn’t happen overnight, and doesn’t usually fit well into a step-by-step plan of building collaborations. As a matter of fact, if you’re not a natural “connector” you’re likely to have to grow a pair . . . of ears.

Volunteer, be purposefully helpful, look for opportunities to help others and to reach out even if there is no obvious or immediate payback. It means going beyond the vertical ties or people in your immediate circle. When you purposefully expand your network, you open up your relationship base which becomes an excellent foundation for aiding you in scaling your construction contracting business.

Your call to action

This article on Small Business Trends offers some good advice concerning building solid, strong, lasting business relationships. It will give you some food for thought.

After you’ve read the article, begin to purposefully think in terms of building relationships and helping those with whom you come into contact on a regular basis. Be open to new opportunities to assist others in both small and large ways. Strive to be “that guy,” the one everyone knows can get things done – because he has connections. “Plays well with others,” really is a good thing, a good thing worth getting really good at.

CoConstruct: Custom Build and Remodel Software

In this monthly post, it’s my pleasure to introduce you to one of the many apps that we at Schulte and Schulte endorse and recommend to our customers.

As a firm of construction accounting specialists, we love to help companies in the construction industry with their books and finances, part of that help is finding different apps or software that can help our clients out. During this monthly feature, we take a look at several apps that we love at Schulte and Schulte, and dig a little deeper into our favorites.

This month, we would like to introduce you to CoConstruct.

CoConstruct is geared specifically for custom home builders and remodelers. This software is designed to include everything that goes into home building from initial client leads, all the way through punchlist and warranty work. The video above gives a brief overview of the software in action, particularly the financial setup of a project start. CoConstruct has a lot more features baked into it than we have time to get into here, but we want to highlight a couple of the features that we believe set CoConstruct apart from other similar apps and software.

Keep Your Clients Informed – “If the clients ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy”
Keeping your clients informed as the project progresses is an essential part of any custom build, and CoConstruct takes a lot of the time involved in doing this off of your hands. Included in the software is a client-only web portal that shows them the information they are looking for; 24-7 access to selections, costs, photos, conversations, job calendar, and more. This gives them the opportunity to know exactly where the project is at, and also allows them to share progress photos and your work with their friends through social media, which translates to referrals for your company!

Improved Client Communication – Kiss the “he said, she said” goodbye
CoConstruct has patent-pending communication technology that allows all communication between your team, client, and trade partners to be found in one place. This allows everyone involved in the project to be on the same page, and if changes happen then everyone involved will be in the communication loop without having to worry about forwarding emails, IMs, or text messages to all of the relevant parties.

Finish Strong – Leave a great last impression on your clients
CoConstruct makes it a priority to see your client’s projects through to completion, even while you are moving on to new jobs. You won’t get caught dropping the ball with your clients and subcontractors regarding warranty work with the reports and reminders that will come up, months and years down the line. It’s the “little things” like this that can make or break a great referral for your company, and CoConstruct has your back.

We love CoConstruct, and would like the opportunity to share it with you. If this sounds like an app that you would be interested in checking out, please let us know!

Job Close Out – Make it snazzy for you and your employees

This is the third in a three-part series of articles. You can find part one here and part two here.

A great Job Close Out system without documentation is only a rumor about the way your company performs the job close out process. If you don’t “get it in writing” then you don’t actually have a system. What you have is wishful thinking.

Think of your construction contracting Job Close Out system as a set of rules, policies, and procedures that trained individuals can repeat as your construction company grows, a standard they can use without your direct involvement.

Creating your system will entail two parts – the simple checklist and the detailed written specifications supporting the checklist.

We’ve never done it that way before

Perhaps in the past you’ve depended on the checklist stored in your head. Or, it could be you have a Job Close Out checklist you expect your employees to follow but have never provided the supporting documents.

Whatever your set of circumstances, if you’ve come to the conclusion that in order to see your business scale you need to add a Job Close Out checklist and Job Close Out procedures to your company’s standards you may find you have some resistance from your employees.

This article from Entrepreneur has a set of steps which I recommend reading and following if you are concerned about getting your employees to come on board and be a part of the new system you’re building on your way to scaling your construction contracting business.

I would emphasize step two when creating the Job Close Out system. Getting the employees involved in this crucial aspect of “leaving a good impression” with your customers helps them see how important this phase of their job is and allows them to input steps you may have overlooked.

Building the checklist

Whether you prefer your checklist be on your digital device or on your clipboard there are options for you.

For instance, you may want to check out the mobile app form from canvas.

As a part of their package, bridgit offers a product simply titled “closeout” which may suit your needs. (BTW, I had a brief chat with one of their representatives and was impressed with her knowledge and willingness to help me with my questions.)

Another option you can look over is Smartsheet which includes in their many construction documents one titled “Project Closeout Checklist.” You’ll have to scroll down quite a way to find it, but it is there.

If you prefer a clipboard over a digital device an option for you might be the Project Closeout Checklist from ready built forms.

As far as I can tell, each of the above options offers you a prebuilt form or a way to design the form you would use for the checklist portion of your Job Close Out system. By starting with the form of your choice you would then be able to prepare the backup documentation in order to complete the system.

One more option

Our good friends at Knowify have within their system a way we can help you design and build your checklist as well as the supporting documents that would then be integrated within your Knowify data base of information. If you’re interested in finding out about how we can work with you through Knowify give us a call 480 -442-4032 or Toll Free – 866-629-7735.

 

Physical Office Processes for Savvy Construction Contractors

Fitting together the pieces of organized office processes

When you think of office processes, what comes to mind?

  • Do you jump immediately to thoughts of your desk, your computer?
  • Are you concerned with “how things get done?”
  • Do you think of your vehicles?

Well, good physical office processes have to do with all of the above and a little bit more.

What is meant by “office processes”?

An easy way to understand office processes is to think of a simple mathematical equation.

Space Planning + Effective Utilization = Impressive Results

While you’re at it, think about this other mathematical equation.

Chaos Increasing + Inefficient Implementation = Profits Decreasing

The first equation works well because it has a place for everything, and everything in its place, plus a good system for all the functions encountered each day in your office.

Your office processes extend to all your office environments

Your construction contracting office is likely to spread across a few different environments. It could exist in a spare bedroom, at a local coffee house, at your work shop, or in a separate designated office space. And, there is a very good chance it exists in your vehicles as well. All the steps necessary to make your physical office processes work in one environment may be employed in all your environments. The good news is there are some basic tenants to hold on to while building or remodeling your processes.

Functions encountered in a construction contractor’s office

Perhaps you deal with only some of the following office functions, and it could well be you deal with other functions not listed. Yet, this is a starter list (in no particular order) to aid you in thinking about the variety of duties and activities accomplished on a regular basis within one or more of your office environments.

  • take care of customer service
  • deal with employee training
  • engage in data entry
  • complete payroll
  • complete and follow up on tax forms
  • process invoices
  • communicate with customers as well as subcontractors.
  • answer phones
  • set appointments
  • handle social media duties
  • prepare marketing materials (or work with your marketing guru)
  • work on office projects
  • work with subcontractors to ensure paperwork is in order including:
    • contracts
    • status with Registrar of Contractors
    • insurance certificates
    • lien releases
    • evaluate subcontractor bids
  • track and process invoices for subcontractors
  • track and process invoices for material providers
  • deal with change order requests
  • handle tracking logs (such as client materials selections)
  • coordinate with outsourced service providers
  • deal with insurance claims
  • track warranty and product information
    • for customers
    • for in-house equipment
  • research, select, bid, and/or order construction materials
  • deal with RFPs
  • assemble applications for subsidies (such as solar credits)
  • run subcontractor orientation sessions
  • maintain contact lists for subcontractors and material suppliers
  • copy, scan, fax and file documents
  • maintain office supplies
  • post and/or prepare required items for the jobsite
  • run errands
  • perform periodic website updates

Scale the processes

Step into, sit down in, or simply think about the space that makes up each of your offices.

While your first thought may be to organize the physical spaces, it is better to think in terms of situating your spaces to accommodate the processes. Identify the purpose of each space by thinking categorically. What gets done here? What work zone is this? Perhaps it will be better to move some office furniture or supplies to a different location in order to allow “next step” actions to take place from left to right, or vice versa, or from a central location to each spoke of what process happens next. Your space will be more accommodating to one set-up or another. Look it over and see what will work best.

The 9 steps to organize by process

  1. Think
  2. Plan
  3. Group like things with like things
  4. Place items most used in most accessible places
  5. Be consistently consistent
  6. Label everything
  7. Simplify every chance you get
  8. Avoid the words “for now…”
  9. Leave yourself some breathing space

Take your time with the plan before going out to buy new office supplies, equipment, or storage solutions.

7 things to consider concerning office organization and set-up

  1. Furniture
  2. Fixtures
  3. Equipment
  4. Lighting
  5. Cable management
  6. Shared spaces (employees and customers)
  7. Storage

When you begin to use the work zones you’ve set up you may find the actual flow needs tweaking. That’s fine. Be open to the idea of moving containers or changing your zones to best fit your needs, while keeping in mind the principles of organization. Think in terms of giving yourself permission to change the system, while being organized about the change itself. If a process is not working, try to determine if it is being handled in the wrong processing zone. Perhaps a change of location is all that is needed.

Using whatever horizontal space is available (for instance, a kitchen table or a rickety old desk) is fine to get started. But making your office space as ergonomically satisfying, as conducive to work, and as handsome as possible as soon as possible is a big step to scaling both your office processes as well as your overall operation.

Lastly, a few things for the cab

To give you a little icing for the cake of your organized office spaces I thought I would mention these handy organizing tools for use in your vehicles. Duluth Trading has a couple of office-cab organizers found here and here. Plus you may want to stop by Mobilegear to see this nice organizing solution.

Today: Jot down some ideas concerning how you can begin making your physical office processes work more systematically.

Tomorrow: Start putting the pieces of your office processes puzzle together. Keep adding pieces daily until you have a stunning, new picture to look at.  

*****

This is the last in a series of articles discussing ways of organizing your construction contracting office, shop, vehicle, and day. You can look through the list of all these articles right here.

KNOWIFY: Manage Your Entire Contracting Business in One Place

In this monthly post, it’s my pleasure to introduce you to one of the many apps that we at Schulte and Schulte endorse and recommend to our customers.

As a firm of construction accounting specialists, we love to help companies in the construction industry with their books and finances, part of that help is finding different apps or software that can help our clients out. During this monthly feature, we take a look at several apps that we love at Schulte and Schulte, and dig a little bit deeper into our favorites.

This month, we would like to introduce you to Knowify.

Knowify is an app that is a huge help to any subcontractor, whether that be commercial or residential. Some of the features that won us over at Schulte and Schulte:

Job Costing & Estimating
With Knowify’s powerful estimating tool, you can plan your jobs, itemize your material budgets, and schedule your people to create comprehensive cost estimates. These estimates can be translated into bid line items with a single click.

Bids, Contracts, & Service Work
You can quickly create bids and contracts on your own letterhead and send them through Knowify for electronic signature. You can also easily create service tickets and schedule technicians on work orders.

Time Tracking & Scheduling
Replace the whiteboard, create and maintain your schedule in Knowify so that all your people can see what needs to be worked on while they are in the field. As your people work on work orders, they can punch in time and reimbursements via Knowify’s mobile app. As your people put in time, Knowify will track how you are performing on each job compared to your budgets and estimated costs.

Knowify is truly cloud-based. You can access your Knowify account on your desktop computer, laptop, or tablet; it’s time tracking is most easily handled through the mobile app that is available for either Android or iOS.
We’ve been impressed with Knowify’s truly unified, fully integrated platform. All of its different modules (contracts, time tracking, purchasing, and invoicing) integrate seamlessly to ensure that the products and billable time covered by our client’s contracts are billed correctly.

We love Knowify, and would love the opportunity to share it with you. If this sounds like an app that you would be interested in checking out, please let us know!

That’s My Story, And I’m Sticking to It.

A carpenter, a stacker, and a few ducks

My dad was a master carpenter who moved up the ranks, retiring as a construction superintendent with many awesome builds under his belt. My mom was counted among the last of the American generations of women who stayed at home taking care of the home front. (The photo accompanying this article is my Mom and Dad’s wedding picture.)

The difference in how they saw the job of “being organized” was immense. Mom was a perpetual and ardent “stacker.” Her piles of magazines, bills, linens, and anything else which could be piled one on another were scattered throughout the house. Dad, on the other hand, used markers to outline around the tools which hung precisely on his shop walls. He labeled and knew where each type of screw was stored, where the touch-up paint was located and how long it had been there.

From that background came little ole’ me. What developed was a semi-stacker who knows that efficiency, therefore productivity, are increased when everything has a place and everything is in its place, yet still must work the process on occasion in order to be sure the ducks are indeed in a row.

Therefore, I’ve had to learn a few tricks of the trade

I was blessed to have studied under Barbara Hemphill of Taming the Paper Tiger fame. She is a well-versed business woman, a fantastic master of organizing solutions, and a mentor certainly worth heeding.

I’ve given you all this background in order to let you know the upcoming series of posts we have in store for you concerning pieces of the organizing puzzle for your construction contracting business come from a mixture of research, previous knowledge, acquired skills, and a desire to make it easier for our clients to build their building businesses.

Some of the goodies we have planned for you are:

In the office:

In the field:

I hope you’ll come along for the ride, find useful tips for improving your construction contracting business, and let me know if you have specific organizing headaches you would like to see addressed.

BTW if you are not already a client of ours, if you happened upon this page through a google search or some other means I need to let you know Schulte and Schulte is a bookkeeping and accounting firm specializing in working with Construction Contractors and Subcontractors who are ready to scale.

Want to know more? Give us a call 480-442-4032. We’ll be happy to discuss the possibilities with you.